Aronson Insurance Blog

Pruning Potential Problems

Tree DamageWith unexpected and damaging storms, like last week’s crushing Nor’Easter we are reminded to revisit the potential safety hazards that trees and their limbs pose to our homes, properties and belongings. Not only are we threatened from above, by falling trees and limbs, but from below with uprooted trees whose extensive root system can destroy utility lines, septic systems, sidewalks and foundations. As with all things in life, being educated and remaining proactive rather than reactive are important in avoiding these problems. Here are some ways to steer clear of a financially upsetting situation as result of a falling tree.

What a problem looks like:

  • Cracks in trunk and large limbs, limbs that hang over the home, or in contact with power lines
  • Hollow trees, trees that lean, or are decayed with mushrooms growing from the bark
  • V-shaped forks rather than U-shaped forks, or crossing branches

What good pruning means:

  • Prevents spread of harmful insects and disease, promotes air circulation and sun penetration which makes for a healthier, stronger tree
  • Do not overprune, and avoid removing branches flush to the trunk as this opens tree to possible decay or insect infestation

Choose the right tree:

  • Not all trees are meant to grow in all places, make sure your trees are right for our region’s soil and temperature
  • Ask your local nursery or landscaper for their opinions on these selections

What to do after the storm:

  • As a rule of thumb it is best to only reset smaller trees
  • When leaving stumps cut them off flush with the ground, if removing them leave four feet of stump above ground as will make removal cheaper
  • Continue to care for and monitor trees after repairs are made